Two-piece raglan sleeves, how I love thee! V8670

I am more stubborn and hardheaded than pretty much any mule you’ll ever have the pleasure of meeting. It is for exactly this reason that when I read two out of three reviews saying that Vogue 8670 was NOT a good pattern, it made me that much more determined to do it anyway. How could I not? I had the pattern already, and just look how cute it is!

Image courtesy of Vogue's website

I also have to confess…I am a sucker for raglan sleeves. I don’t know what it is about them, but for some reason they simply suit my body. I have large biceps and a serious hatred of having a wad of fabric in my armpit, and it seems to me that raglan style sleeves do the best job of addressing both of those issues. No clue why, but there it is. I also don’t feel like I need a forward shoulder adjustment with raglan sleeves.

Along with my love for raglan sleeves, I also discovered a love of two-piece sleeves. Now normally, I hate extra seams–especially when they seem pointless. But when I finished the sleeves on this shirt with it’s lovely raglan two-pieced sleeves, the angels began to sing, the fit was so glorious!

So anyway, here’s my review:

Pattern Sizing: Standard for women’s. However, the actual pattern runs big, as noted by other reviewers. I think it seems to be about 1-2 sizes off, depending on the look you are going for.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it? Yes!

Were the instructions easy to follow? So easy a caveman could do it. 😉

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern? I didn’t like that the pattern was off on the sizing, but sometimes it just happens.

I L.O.V.E. the two piece sleeve! Between it and the raglan sleeve, I didn’t feel like I should have done a large bicep alteration nor a forward shoulder adjustment, and I am thrilled!

Fabric Used: A really (really!) lightweight sweater knit from Fabric.com. It only had crosswise stretch (and not as much as recommended) but it worked fine. Another note: I made this in a size 12, 3/4 sleeve using only 1.5 yards of 60″ wide fabric. I’d suggest going with 1.75, especially if you need to lengthen the sleeves or the bodice, because otherwise the pattern pieces won’t fit very well on the remaining fabric–the sleeves on mine ended up being 1/2″ shorter than they would have been because I didn’t have quite enough fabric. No biggie, since I have short arms, but YMMV.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made: I made view A with 3/4 length sleeves….or did I make view B without the contrast sleeves? Either way, you get the idea. 😉

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others? I plan to use it again, probably rather frequently. The sleeves and the bust darts make it a winner, as does the not-quite-skintight fit. I need all the “skimming” I can get!

I would recommend it to others because it’s simple and cute. It’s not perfect right out of the envelope, but none of them are, so just carefully measure the pattern and know that the fit isn’t meant to be skintight. If you take that into account, I think you’ll be pleased with this super-fast, super-easy shirt!

Conclusion: If you like the style, make it. 🙂

OK, so actually, I lied. This sweater isn’t completely finished. It needs a neckband. Why? Because I was debating on whether to make it V-neck or not, since I’ve noticed that v-necks make my face look less round. Suggestions? Would it look OK as a v-neck, or should I just leave it alone? I seriously only have like 20 minutes of sewing left on this thing either way (it’s even hemmed fer Pete’s sake!), but if I don’t finish it, I’ll forget about it. 😉

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3 thoughts on “Two-piece raglan sleeves, how I love thee! V8670

  1. Glad to hear that this pattern worked out for you! I am not sure how turning it into a vneck would work. It sounds a little tricky, but if you can do it, why not go for it?

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  2. Pingback: Vogue 8670 and forgetfulness… | Splinters & Stitches

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